Sausage & Egg Breakfast Bites

Here’s a nice, versatile way to prepare eggs. I used onions and red and green bell peppers, but any vegetable will do. You can eat them cold or hot, but I prefer them hot.

Sausage bites

Sausage & Egg Breakfast Bites

INGREDIENTS:

  • 1 small bunch of dark greens, such as kale, Swiss chard, beet greens or spinach
  • 1-2 cups of crumbled, uncooked sausage
  • 8-10 eggs
  • a small bunch of parsley or other fresh herb

METHOD:

  1. Preheat the oven to 375 F.

  2. Slice the greens into thin strips (if using kale, removed the stems). Saute in oil or butter over medium heat for several minutes, then add the crumbled sausage.

  3. Continue to saute until sausage is basically cooked, then turn off heat.

  4. Whisk the eggs then stir in the parsley, kale and sausage.

  5. Pour into a greased 8?ó8 pan. Bake 20-25 minutes.

  6. Let cool slightly before cutting into squares.

Shrimp and Sausage Gumbo

It’s starting get cold here, so I thought it would be a good time to make some soup. And since I’ve been in the mood for something spicy, I thought I would make Shrimp and Sausage Gumbo.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped (about 3/4‚Äù pieces)
  • 1 celery rib, sliced (1/2‚Äù pieces)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • Salt and black pepper, to taste
  • 1 lb. Polish pork sausage or Italian pork sausage, cut into 1/2‚Äù slices
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 4 cups chicken stock
  • 2 sprigs thyme
  • 3/4 lb. shrimp, cooked
  • 1/4 cup flat-leaf parsley, chopped

METHOD:

Heat the oil in a large pot; add the onion, bell pepper, celery, garlic, cayenne pepper, salt and black pepper. Cook over medium-high heat until the vegetables are tender. Add sausage until lightly browned. Sprinkle meat and vegetables with flour and stir well. Add chicken stock, sprigs of thyme, and shrimp; bring to a simmer. Season with salt, if needed. Allow to simmer for about 15 minutes. Stir in parsley and remove sprigs of thyme immediately before serving.

Choucroute Garnie

I’ve been looking for an excuse to checkout the German Deli and this recipe was it. The recipe is impossible to mess up, but you do need high quality German ingredients. The good thing about this recipe is you don’t – and shouldn’t – follow it exactly. Just use what you can find. I didn’t have any pork loin or pork belly, which I would have liked, so I just substituted different kinds of bratwurst.

Choucroute Garnie

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 tablespoons rendered duck fat, or pork fat
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 2 lbs. sauerkraut
  • 10 juniper berries
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • 3 cups dry white wine, preferably Riesling
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon coriander
  • 4 boiled potatoes
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • 4 frankfurters
  • 4 boudin blanc
  • 4 slices of smoked pork loin
  • 4 slices of salted pork belly

METHOD:

  1. Heat duck fat in a large pot. Add the onion, and cook for about 5 minutes. Add the sauerkraut, juniper berries, garlic, wine, spices and salt and pepper. Cover and bring to a simmer.

  2. Add the pork belly and smoked pork loin, cover and cook for 1 1/2 hours. In a separate pot, bring water to a simmer. Then add the frankfurters, boudin blanc, and potatoes. Heat for 5 minutes.

  3. To serve: place sauerkraut in the centre of a large serving platter. Arrange meats and boiled potatoes around the sauerkraut. Serve a flavourful grainy mustard with all dishes except the fish choucroute.

Transylvanian Stockpot

For dinner, I made the Transylvanian Stockpot from The Primal Blueprint Cookbook. The recipe is on page 44.

I made a few changes to the recipe. First, I used uncooked polish kielbasa and just fried them up in lard (and left the lard in the pot). Second, I love cabbage so I put more in than the recipe called for. Finally, because of all the cabbage, I used a little more liquid. I added an extra cup of chicken broth, and about 2 cups of water. I wanted the make sure that the liquid completely covered all the meat and vegetables.

Like most traditional stews/soups, this one has everything that makes these recipes so good, and it’s dead simple to make. Lots of fat and protein, and just the right amount of vegetables to round out the flavors. I will definitely be making this again.